HAVE is one of the most basic words in the English language, but its use can be a little difficult as in its use as an auxiliary verb. This post will have a look at HAVE and in which situations we can use it. It will also offer a vocabulary boost with useful collocations with HAVE.

THE USE OF HAVE  

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  HAVE as a general verb: We generally use have to talk about ownership or possession. For example, I have a white car. I have 104 friends. I don´t have a cat.   HAVE in the present perfect: When have is used as part of the present perfect, it becomes an auxiliary verb and the meaning is no longer about possession. We use have + past participle For instance, I have been to Peru. She has travelled the world. You haven´t finished yet.  Possibly the most confusing part is that we can use have got to express possession, even though it is the present perfect. Take a look at, I have got a red computer. You haven´t got a big house.   HAVE can also be used in the future perfect: I will have finished my homework by 8pm.   HAVE can also be used as part of the modal perfect; I might have passed if I had studies more.  

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  Collocations with HAVE: Have a look at Have a good time Have fun Have a helping hand Have a bath Have a shower Have an appointment Have an argument/quarrel Have an advantage Have a baby Have a bite to eat Have a break Have a meeting Have business Have a chance Have an opportunity Have an exam Have a chat Have a conversation Have an excuse Have a grudge Have a headache Have a laugh Have a meal Have a nap Have a good sleep Have a party Have a point Have a plan Have a problem Have a relationship Have a talk Have time Have trouble Have a word with someone Have word (to do) Have a job Have in common Have an accident Have difficulty in (doing) something Have a feeling Have a dream Have a try/go Have a snooze Have a lie down Have an enemy in (someone) Have a fight Have a shave Have a hair-cut Have a workout Have a stretch Have a drink Have a beer Have a taste Have a smell Have a listen  

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  Phrasal verbs with HAVE: Have against – I have nothing against you, but we have nothing in common Have around – (invite) We had our neighbour round for tea yesterday Have down as – (consider as) I have him down as a lazy worker Have in – We had the builders in to fix the roof Have in for – (dislike someone) My boss has it in for me Have off
  • I had Monday off work to move house
  • (slang = sexual relations) My girlfriends and I had it off
Have on
  • (not carry) I don´t have my keys on me
  • (wear) You have a hat on
Have out with – I had it out with my employee about his mistake Have over – (the same as have around) Have up (on charges) – The police have him up on charges for criminal damage  

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  HAVE as part of the causative: The causative is used when we pay, make or delegate someone else to do something for us.   FORM = NOUN + HAVE/GET + NOUN + PAST PARTICIPLE (+ BY/WITH + NOUN/SUBJECT)   Examples:                                                                 Meaning: I get my hair cut by the barber on Main Street.                   The barber on Main Street cuts my hair. I have my shopping delivered to my house.                          The shopping is delivered to my house. I am going to have the house painted.                                   I will pay someone to paint my house. I had my car fixed at the garage.                                              The mechanic fixed my car at the garage.   *Using get is more informal than have but has exactly the same meaning and is more common in spoken English.  

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To enhance your understand of HAVE you need to practice and use all 4 skills needed for language (READING, WRITING, SPEAKING AND LISTENING). We hope you have found the latest example of our series on VOCABULARY useful.

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